EMDR | EMDR PTSD Therapy
EMDR - Therapy to Get Past Your Past · EMDR

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR)

December 1st, 2017

EMDR

What is EMDR – Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is a psychotherapy treatment that was originally designed to alleviate the distress associated with traumatic memories (Shapiro, 1989a, 1989b).

Shapiro’s (2001) Adaptive Information Processing model posits that EMDR therapy facilitates the accessing and processing of traumatic memories and other adverse life experience to bring these to an adaptive resolution.

After successful treatment with EMDR therapy, affective distress is relieved, negative beliefs are reformulated, and physiological arousal is reduced.

What is the EMDR Approach?

Therapist directed lateral eye movements are the most commonly used external stimulus but a variety of other stimuli including hand-tapping and audio stimulation are often used (Shapiro, 1991).

Shapiro (1995, 2001) hypothesizes that EMDR therapy facilitates the accessing of the traumatic memory network, so that information processing is enhanced, with new associations forged between the traumatic memory and more adaptive memories or information.

These new associations are thought to result in complete information processing, new learning, elimination of emotional distress, and development of cognitive insights.

There are 7 phases to that are used to administer the simple but effective form of therapy.

Phase 1.  The Therapist will prepare the patient/client before directed lateral eye movements are initiated.  The therapist takes a thorough history of the client and develops a treatment plan

 

what is emdr?

Maialisa / Pixabay

Phase 2. This is the phase of treatment where the therapist ensures that the client has several different ways of handling emotional distress during the therapy session.  The therapist may teach the client a variety of imagery and stress reduction techniques the client can use during and between sessions. A goal of EMDR therapy is to produce rapid and effective change while the client maintains equilibrium during and between sessions.

 

Phase 3.  This is the Assessment and Reprocessing phase. A negative experience is isolated and targeted.  This target is then properly identified and processed using EMDR therapy procedures.  The client will identify the clear visual image related to the memory, a particular negative belief about his/her self, and related emotions.

Phase 4: This is the Desensitization phase.  It gives the opportunity to identify and resolve similar events that may have occurred and are associated with the target.

Phase 5 – 6: The goal of this phase is to concentrate on and increase the strength of the positive belief that the person has identified to replace his original negative belief.
Evaluations of thousands of EMDR sessions indicate that there is a physical response to unresolved thoughts.

This finding has been supported by independent studies of memory indicating that when a person is negatively affected by trauma, information about the traumatic event is stored in motoric (or body systems) memory, rather than narrative memory, and retains the negative emotions and physical sensations of the original event.

When that information is processed, however, it can then move to narrative (or verbalizable) memory and the body sensations and negative feelings associated with it disappear.

Phase 7:  In phase seven, closure, the therapist asks the client to keep a log during the week.  The log should document any related material that may arise.  It serves to remind the client of the self-calming activities that were mastered in phase two.

Conclusion

EMDR is probably your next option if you suffer from everyday memories that create low self-esteem, feelings of powerlessness, and all the myriad problems that go with most mood swings. According to the EMDR Official Website, millions of people have been treated successfully over the past 25 years.  After successful treatment with EMDR therapy, affective distress is relieved, negative beliefs are reformulated, and physiological arousal is reduced.

Resources

EMDR THERAPY

November 28th, 2017

EMDR therapy involves focusing on three periods of time: yesteryear, present, and future. Focus is offered to past disturbing memories and related events. Also, it’s given to current situations that induce distress, and to developing the relevant skills and attitudes necessary for positive future actions. With EMDR therapy, these items are addressed having an eight-phase treatment approach.

Phase 1: The first phase can be a history-taking session(s). The therapist assesses the client’s readiness and develops a therapy plan. Client and therapist identify possible targets for EMDR processing. These include distressing memories and current situations that cause emotional distress. Other targets might include related incidents previously. Emphasis is positioned about the progression of specific skills and behaviors that will be needed by the client later on situations.

Initial EMDR processing could be given to childhood events rather than to adult onset stressors or the identified critical incident in the event the client had a problematic childhood. Clients generally gain insight on their situations, the emotional distress resolves and they learn to change their behaviors. The length of treatment depends on upon the amount of traumas and the age of PTSD onset. Generally, individuals with single event adult onset trauma could be successfully treated in less than 5 hours. Multiple trauma victims might require a lengthier treatment time.

Phase 2: During the next phase of treatment, the therapist helps to ensure that the customer has lots of different ways of handling emotional distress. The therapist may teach the client a variety of imagery and stress reduction techniques the customer may use during and between sessions. An objective of EMDR treatment therapy is to make a rapid and effective change while the client maintains equilibrium during and between sessions.

Phases 3-6: In phases 3 to 6, a target is identified and processed using EMDR therapy procedures. These involve the customer identifying three things:
1. The vivid visual image associated with the memory
2. A negative belief about self
3. Related emotions and the entire body sensations.

Furthermore, your client identifies a good belief. The therapist helps the customer rate the positive belief along with the power of the negative emotions. Next, the client is made to target the image, negative thought, and the entire body sensations while simultaneously engaging in EMDR processing using sets of bilateral stimulation. These sets might include eye movements, taps, or tones. The type and period of these sets differ for each and every client. At this time, the EMDR client is expected to just notice whatever spontaneously happens.

After each pair of stimulation, the clinician instructs your client to permit his/her mind to go blank and to notice whatever thought, feeling, image, memory, or sensation one thinks of. Depending upon the client’s report, the clinician will select the next focus of attention. These repeated sets with directed focused attention occur numerous times throughout the session. If the client becomes distressed or has difficulty in progressing, the therapist follows established procedures to assist the client in getting back on track.

If the client reports no distress related to the targeted memory, (s)he could be required to think of the preferred positive thought was identified at the beginning of the session. At this time, your client may adjust the positive belief if needed, after which focus on it throughout the next set of distressing events.

Phase 7: In phase seven, closure, the therapist asks the customer to keep a log during the week. The log should document any related material which could arise. It serves to remind the client of the self-calming activities that were mastered in phase two.

Phase 8: The next session begins with phase eight. Phase eight consists of examining the progress made to date. The EMDR treatment processes all related historical events, current incidents that elicit distress, and future events that will need different responses

PTSD Definition

November 19th, 2017

PTSD Definition is Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and it’s normal to have upsetting memories, feel on edge, or have trouble sleeping after this type of event. At first, it may be hard to do normal daily activities, like go to work, go to school, or spend time with people you care about. But most people start to feel better after a few weeks or months.

If it’s been longer than a few months and you’re still having symptoms, you may have PTSD. For some people, PTSD symptoms may start later on, or they may come and go over time.

What factors affect who develops PTSD?

PTSD can happen to anyone. It is not a sign of weakness. A number of factors can increase the chance that someone will have PTSD, many of which are not under that person’s control. For example, having a very intense or long-lasting traumatic event or getting injured during the event can make it more likely that a person will develop PTSD. PTSD is also more common to somebody after certain types of trauma, like combat and sexual assault.

Personal factors, like previous traumatic exposure, age, and gender, can affect whether or not a person will develop PTSD. What happens after the traumatic event is also important. Stress can make PTSD more likely, while social support can make it less likely.

What are the symptoms of PTSD?

PTSD symptoms usually start soon after the traumatic event, but they may not appear until months or years later. They also may come and go over many years. If the symptoms last longer than four weeks, cause you great distress, or interfere with your work or home life, you might have PTSD.

There are four types of symptoms of PTSD, but they may not be exactly the same for everyone. Each person experiences symptoms in their own way.

  • Reliving the event (also called re-experiencing symptoms). You may have bad memories or nightmares. You even may feel like you’re going through the event again. This is called a flashback.
  • Avoiding situations that remind you of the event. You may try to avoid situations or people that trigger memories of the traumatic event. You may even avoid talking or thinking about the event.
  • Having more negative beliefs and feelings. The way you think about yourself and others may change because of the trauma. You may feel guilt or shame. Or, you may not be interested in activities you used to enjoy. You may feel that the world is dangerous and you can’t trust anyone. You might be numb, or find it hard to feel happy.
  • Feeling keyed up (also called hyperarousal). You may be jittery or always alert and on the lookout for danger. Or, you may have trouble concentrating or sleeping. You might suddenly get angry or irritable, startle easily, or act in unhealthy ways (like smoking, using drugs and alcohol, or driving recklessly.

EMDR is Stephen Fry proof thanks to caching by WP Super Cache

EMDR PTSD Therapy| EMDR